cinephiliabeyond:

The Canadian director David Cronenberg has redefined the notion of what a horror film can be. While horror and science-fiction films traditionally have been about threats from the outside — monsters or alien forces — Cronenberg’s films have been about threats that come from inside our own bodies, and our psyches. It was fitting, then, that Cronenberg should be the director to adapt William S. Burroughs’s novel Naked Lunch, with its grotesque and comical mix of the organic, the chemical, and the hallucinatory. Cronenberg spoke at the Museum of the Moving Image with a premiere screening of Naked Lunch  on the opening day of a complete retrospective of his films. —A Pinewood Dialogue with David Cronenberg

David Cronenberg and The Making of Naked Lunch performs just what it says on the tin, as the director and many of his collaborators, including Burroughs, speak on the film, which offers an increasingly paranoid look at one writer’s process and also his fear of slowly growing bugs in New York City. The documentary examines just how Burroughs life seeped its way into Cronenberg’s vision — including events related to those portrayed in the recent Allen Ginsberg drama Kill Your Darlings — and how they made the decidedly uncinematic act of writing compelling. “In order to convey the act of writing to someone who hasn’t written, you have to be quite outrageous,” says Cronenberg. Anyone who’s seen the final result can confirm its success on that front, but now we can take a look at the puppeteers behind the many grotesque creations in the film and appreciate.

Naked Making Lunch

David Cronenberg’s screenplay for Naked Lunch. Based on the novel by William S. Burroughs [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). Thanks to Write To Reel’s R.P. McMurphy a.k.a. Lobo. The DVD/Blu-ray of the film is available at the Criterion Collection's site. Absolutely our highest recommendation.

For further reading, viewing, and listening:

Behind the scenes photos courtesy of the Criterion Collection & Will McCrabb.

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(via kadrey)

"One of the dumbest things you were ever taught was to write what you know. Because what you know is usually dull. Remember when you first wanted to be a writer? Eight or 10 years old, reading about thin-lipped heroes flying over mysterious viny jungles toward untold wonders? That’s what you wanted to write about, about what you didn’t know. So. What mysterious time and place don’t we know?"
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KEN KESEY (via kadrey)
rufusdayglo:

I’m Batman. With apologies to Frank Miller. A Tank Girl commission piece.
Nice way to spend your Sunday… luke warm coffee, war films, and drawing Batman…. decapitated…
Love’n’tanks
Rufus

rufusdayglo:

I’m Batman. With apologies to Frank Miller. A Tank Girl commission piece.

Nice way to spend your Sunday… luke warm coffee, war films, and drawing Batman…. decapitated…

Love’n’tanks

Rufus

ivoryathena:

Badass women from history

  1. Leather clad English rocker girl
  2. Women boxing on a roof in LA (1933)
  3. Ellen O’Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s
  4. Elspeth Beard, first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle

(via anniewu)

zegas:

Keith Giffen, Larry Mahlstedt & Paul Levitz & Legion of Super Heroes

justinvictor7:

Covers and pages from The Legion of Superheroes #293 and #294 (1982) by Levitz, Giffen, Mahlstedt, Costanza, Gafford, Sutton and Berger.

Despite my once-intense love for DC comics, I never really got into the Legion. Even though they were technically part of the same continuity, the future setting positioned them as something ‘other’ that I didn’t need to pay attention to in order to keep up with the superhero world I was interested in. I did start getting into them in the waning days of the old DCU thanks to Johns and Frank’s work with them in Action, as well as Waid and Kitson’s ‘threeboot’ stuff.

The Great Darkness Saga seems to be regarded as the best story in the classic Levitz/Giffen era, and it can be had cheaply so I gave it a shot, as well as a few issues that lead up to it. The images above are just from the last two parts.

At least in this story, the Legionnaires themselves aren’t that appealing as personalities. They’re bratty and petty and shallow, almost comically concerned with who gets to be leader. Maybe this is Paul Levitz’s way of demonstrating their youth. In any case I couldn’t really latch on to any of the characters, but as a broad concept, they’re a lot of fun. There are so damn many of them, with such colorful costumes and fun powers. Levitz does a great job giving most of the huge cast a moment to shine. He and Giffen also plot out the central mystery quite well, peppering in lots of hints before finally revealing the nature of the big bad.

It’s cool to see Darkseid and other Fourth World concepts clash with this mob of superkids from the future, and it’s all expertly rendered by Keith Giffen. This is Giffen in perhaps a more traditional mode, but his storytelling and acting are top notch, adding lots of emotion to the epic action. He uses tons of panels and details but the pages never feel cluttered or hard to look at. Carl Gafford’s lively, varied coloring should also be lauded. This really is a visually striking book.

All in all, I had a lot of fun with this story. It’s exactly what you hope it will be - epic, old school superhero action on a cosmic scale. And it helped me gain more appreciation for the Legion as a whole. I know DC have basically abandoned the concept, but if I was in charge I would figure out a way to reboot the team and make them stick. A book that’s part Justice League, part Star Wars and part teen romance seems like a slam dunk, especially for the tumblr crowd, and it’s kind of baffling that they haven’t been able to make it work.

philnoto:

Frank and Medusa- This one goes out to Marvel’s social media extraordinaire, Janna O’Shea who happens to be a fan of 2 of my favorite characters. Have a good, SAFE weekend everyone!

philnoto:

Frank and Medusa- This one goes out to Marvel’s social media extraordinaire, Janna O’Shea who happens to be a fan of 2 of my favorite characters. Have a good, SAFE weekend everyone!

punisher Medusa